Is the Sun Conscious?

Sun Gathering

By Rupert Sheldrake

From The Bridging Tree, Vol. 1 No. 1 – Winter, 1997 – 1998

Over the summer solstice of 1997, thirteen people of diverse backgrounds and disciplines met in a secluded valley in the west of England to discuss the consciousness of the Sun. One participant, John O’Donohue, an Irish poet and visionary, arrived with the misunderstanding that we meant human consciousness of the Sun in science, myth and art. When he discovered we meant the consciousness of the Sun itself, he later confessed he was convinced that this would be a non-starter. In fact, it proved to be the most wonderful starter to all our imaginations. No one is used to thinking about the consciousness of the Sun. The subject is rarely raised, still less discussed. There are no experts. If we want to think about this subject, we’re on our own.

As Kevin McCarthy, a school teacher, pointed out, young children almost invariably draw the sun with a face and a smile. Its consciousness is not discussed but simply accepted. And the face has eyes: the Sun does not only emit light but also sees. Similar imagery of the Sun is found in all civilisations including Egypt, Babylonia, Greece, Rome, India, and in Christendom.

On the other hand, since the seventeenth century, science has portrayed the universe as inanimate. The Sun is simply a star like other stars, burning up fuel. Celestial bodies, like all other bodies, are essentially mechanical. In modem scientific thought, the Sun cannot be conscious. The question does not even arise.

For materialists, our consciousness is nothing other than the activity of our brains. From this point of view, since consciousness is confined to human brains ( and is perhaps present to a lesser degree in higher animals) then neither the Sun nor the stars, nor the Earth, nor anything within it except man and perhaps some animals can have consciousness. The Sun, Gaia and indeed the entire universe cannot be conscious because they do not have brains.

Most materialists suppose that the complex electromagnetic rhythms in our brains provide the interface between brain activity and consciousness. Could rhythmic patterns of electromagnetic activity likely be associated with the consciousness of the Sun? One of the starting points of our discussions was the recent discovery of the extraordinary dynamism of the Sun. The eleven year sun-spot cycles, linked to reversals of the magnetic polarity of the Sun are well known. But the sun has recently been found to reverberate, like a gong, to over a million pitches, each bouncing back and forth through the different layers of the interior of the Sun, with the resonance being determined by their pitch. As well as this extraordinarily complex spatio-temporal pattern of vibration, there are the oscillations, perturbations, and harmonics of the electromagnetic field associated with the phenomena on the surface of the Sun such as sun-spots. Magnetic storms on the sun are so intense that they can disrupt radio communications, cause homing pigeons to lose their way, and in other ways affect what happens on Earth.

A cosmologist at Queen Mary College, London (who prefers to remain anonymous) described some of the ways these investigations are being carried out through an international programme called SOHO (the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) with a special satellite positioned at the point of equal gravity between the Earth and the Sun and orbiting around the Sun together with the Earth, permitting continuous examinations and observations of the Sun’s activity. Meanwhile an earth-based network of observatories, GONG (the Global Oscillation Network Group), is also tracking the Sun’s vibratory activities 24 hours a day, overcoming the interruption of observations by nightfall by means of observatories at different longitudes.

Perhaps the Sun can think in a way barely imaginable to our more limited power of thinking, its thoughts interfacing with its ever changing patterns of vibratory activity. In this way, it is scientifically imaginable that the Sun could be conscious.

The scientists among us were more interested in such arguments than some of the other participants. Some, like esotericist and educator Ida Urso, said they had never doubted for a moment that the Sun was conscious. They thought of the whole universe as conscious; and if there is consciousness in everything, why not the Sun?

Inevitably, it was not long before we found ourselves discussing what was meant by consciousness. Christopher Clarke, a physicist, was opposed to any attempt to see consciousness as a kind of add-on extra, somehow fitted into a world of autonomous physical processes in autonomous space-time. Consciousness, in his view, is somehow fundamental or innate to physical processes and these processes are not separable from space-time itself. Space and time are not absolutes, as they were for Newton, but bound up with everything else, including consciousness.

On the morning of the summer solstice itself, most of us set off at 4 AM in the dim grey light and in steady rain. Our hopes of seeing the sunrise seemed remote. We climbed up across the fields to a nearby hilltop, the site of an ancient Iron Age fort, the Blackdown Rings. As we entered the circular enclosure, we passed through a simple ceremony involving the elements of earth,air, fire and water and leapt over a mid-summer fire. We then climbed up to the highest point, and there miraculously, in the Northeastern horizon was a window in the cloud over Dartmoor. And there we saw the Sun rise. The full moon shone between the rain clouds in the west. And as the Sun rose there was a rainbow behind us. After this extraordinary display, Jill Purce led us in a chant.

When we started our discussions again later that day, more questions came to mind. We thought about the Sun’s relationship with the other stars. Do stars communicate with each other? Can they do so through gravitational effects and electro-magnetic radiation, not only in the visible range, but through x-rays, radio waves, and particle emissions? Or can they also communicate “telepathically”? Does the galaxy itself have a mind at a yet higher level, or is it simply a kind of collective consciousness of the individual star-minds within it? If the Sun has habits, like all other living organisms, then these habits will probably be unconscious, as habits usually are. Thus the Sun may have an unconscious mind. And perhaps stars have a collective unconscious. By this time everyone was really having fun and we were so far beyond any known bounds of academic respectability we all felt quite free.

On the last day of our gathering we came to the question of intergalactic telepathy. The scientific starting point for this particular discussion was that any messages that traveled at the speed of light would take billions of light years to reach distant galaxies, and the same again for the message to return to our galaxy. Even within this galaxy, light based or radio based communication would be very slow. Our galaxy, the Milky Way, is over 100,000 light years across. So for a radio signal to reach from one solar system on one side of the galaxy to one on the other side, and for the message to return, it would take 200,000 years. It is unlikely that any human type civilisation would be around in 200,000 years time, and even if it were, the record-keeping system would have to be immaculate if the original message to which this was the reply, were not to be forgotten. Only through some form of communication vastly faster than light, or through some other kind of non-local linkage, could conscious communication occur within and between galaxies.

For me, one of the most astonishing thoughts was rather casually advanced by David Lorimer, director of the Scientific and Medical Network. He told us that in August, 1997 the followers of the Bulgarian teacher Peter Dhunov, would be gathering in Bulgaria to commune with the spirit of their deceased master and other illuminated beings who would be meeting in the Sun at the same time!

Satish Kumar told us of the traditional Indian belief that the departed spirits of enlightened human beings pass first into the light of the Sun and then to dimensions or realms beyond; the Sun was a kind of gateway through which human consciousness could move after bodily death.

As our time together drew to a close our minds were boggling. It was the most stimulating and enjoyable few days of discussion I have attended in many years. But needless to say, we came to no firm conclusions about the consciousness of the Sun.

I for one am very grateful for this blessed time we spent together, and to the Lifebridge Foundation for making it possible.

Rupert Sheldrake

July 30, 1997

PO Box 327
High Falls, NY 12440
Tel: 845-658-3439
Email: info@lifebridge.org

What do billions of stars have in common with your DNA? – Helix

We’re made of stardust. The source of protein amino acids is geologic and cosmic.

Elements like hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon, phosphorus, and oxygen are all formed in the bellies of stars. These same elements combine to form molecules like adenine, guanine, thymine, and cytosine (the nucleotides in our DNA). In this way, our DNA is made of stardust.

The article

https://blog.helix.com/2018/05/dna-galaxy-explorer/

Scientists Discover Huge ‘Extragalactic Structure’ in Hidden Region of Space

The obscured “zone of avoidance” in space is a place of mystery, and scientists are peering at what’s inside it.

Becky Ferreira

by Becky Ferreira

November 3, 2022, 9:49am

The VISTA Telescope. Image: MARTIN BERNETTI / Staff via Getty Images

Scientists have discovered a huge “extragalactic structure” hidden behind the Milky Way in a mysterious area of the sky known as the “zone of avoidance” because it is obscured by our own galaxy’s opaque bulge, according to a new preprint study. The discovery of the structure, which appears to be a large galaxy cluster, helps to fill in this shadowy part of our cosmic map, which may as well be labeled “here be space dragons” because it is so unclear what exists there. (The Draco? Red Dragon Tribe banned from our sector, kept out by The Guardians)

The star stuff that makes up our galaxy, the Milky Way, is distributed inside a thin plane that orbits around a central bulge that contains a supermassive black hole. The galactic plane and bulge are packed with stars, dust, and gas that block our view of whatever is on the other side. Though scientists have been able to use different wavelengths to peer through the zone of avoidance (ZoA), a region that obscures 10 to 20 percent of the sky, most of this region still remains out of view.

Now, a team led by Daniela Galdeano, an astronomer at the National University of San Juan in Argentina, report the discovery of “ a new galaxy cluster, VVVGCl-B J181435-381432, behind the Milky Way bulge,” which helps to complete “the picture of the large scale structure in this still little explored area of the sky,” according to a study posted this week on the preprint server arxiv. (The study has been submitted to the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics but has not yet been peer-reviewed.)“This result is very satisfying for us,” said Galdeano in an email to Motherboard. “For many years, the ZoA had a lack of information, but now with new studies we could cover a little region of the sky, and in the near future, a bigger region with data.”“It is incredibly difficult to find galaxies behind the galactic plane, because of the high density of stars and also the obscuration by dust along the line of sight, and this looked like one of the most prominent candidates,” noted Dante Minniti, director of the Institute of Astrophysics at Andrés Bello National University in Chile and a co-author of the study, in another email to Motherboard. “We suspected the presence of structure,” he added, “but since this was a ‘blind region’ before, this discovery of a new galaxy cluster was a nice confirmation.”

Galdeano and her colleagues were able to spot this cluster within the ZoA (zone of avoidance) using the VVV Survey, a project that scans the Milky Way bulge at infrared wavelengths using the European Southern Observatory’s Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) in Paranal, Chile. Whereas the galactic plane blocks out almost all visible light in the zone, longer wavelengths of light, including in the infrared band, are able to travel through the Milky Way’s haze to reach telescopes on Earth. 

The team previously used the infrared glow captured in the VVV Survey to probe an “overdensity region” in the ZOA that suggested the presence of “new extragalactic sources that have not been identified by other catalogs,” according to a 2021 study also led by Galdeano. To zoom in on the tantalizing region, the researchers used a near-infrared instrument called FLAMINGOS-2, which is on the Gemini South telescope in Chile, to identify measurements called “redshifts” that can be used to estimate the distance and velocities of its objects in space.

The results exposed new details about five galaxies some three billion light years away, which the researchers think are part of a much bigger cluster. “I started working with VVV data in 2017, and from the beginning we noticed an excess of galaxies in a small region of the sky,” Galdeano said. “During all these years we had the suspicion that these galaxies belonged to the same structure. These suspicions were based on photometric techniques, so we could not confirm these conclusions.” 

“It is for this reason that we requested follow-up telescope time to obtain the spectra of the brightest galaxies in these overdensity regions with the aim to confirm or discard our suspicions,” she added. “Fortunately we could confirm our conclusions, so we are very happy and proud with these results.”The team estimated that the cluster contains about 58 galaxies, but it will take more observations to be sure of its mass and contents. “It looks quite big, but it is difficult to tell yet how massive,” Minniti said. “We need more spectroscopic redshifts to estimate the mass of this cluster.”

The discovery of this cluster offers an exciting glimpse behind the Milky Way, and scientists will need to continue pulling back this curtain in order to understand our place in space. For instance, in addition to hidden galaxy clusters, the ZoA contains the so-called Great Attractor, an unidentified gravitational anomaly that is tugging galaxies and clusters toward it. The nature of this huge attractor is a mystery that can only be solved by more observations and research.To that end, it’s unclear whether we will ever be able to figure out what lies in this eclipsed zone, but regardless, Minniti noted that he and his colleagues “are prepared to be surprised.”“There are some areas that have a lot of dust and stars, so the absorption [of light] is very high, and this is an obstacle that is very difficult,” Galdeano concluded. “Nevertheless, we work hard to explore these mysterious regions, so we hope to have an approach and find out interesting results in the near future.”

What is a Binary Star?

The scientists don’t PRESUME binary stars. They exist in 85% of star systems. They are ideal and are needed to bring balance to the frequency.

How rare is a binary star?

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Actually, most stars are in binary systems. Perhaps up to 85% of stars are in binary systems with some in triple or even higher-multiple systems. The orbital periods and distances of binaries vary enormously.

For some time now, astronomers have known that the majority of systems in our galaxy consist of binary pairs rather than individual stars. What’s more, in recent decades, research has revealed that stars like our Sun are actually born in clusters within solar nebulas. Aug 19, 2020

We likely have the Draco and the Reptilians to thank for busting into our system when the grid came down during the Maldek explosion and trying to take over. They are very male-dominated and patriarchal so Lucifer B.S. had his way on Maldek and Earth. It wasn’t supposed to be this way and caused great error and imbalance. And Lucifer was a highly trusted system ruler, an angel of light. We know how that turned out.

What does it mean if a star is binary?

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A binary star

Binary stars are two stars orbiting a common center of mass. The brighter star is officially classified as the primary star, while the dimmer of the two is the secondary (classified as A and B respectively). In cases where the stars are of equal brightness, the designation given by the discoverer is respected. Jan 17, 2018

The Tzolkin pulses to the binary triplet configuration 2/3, which holds the 13:20 coordinate but sprockets with 3D 12:60. It’s explained in my book, “Time is DNA”.

Everything about our Harmonic is BINARY (+/-). We are binary and bilateral in our bodies, our system is currently dualistic. The bridge is 2, 3, and 4. 12:60 divides by 2, 3 and 4. 13 is a prime number and 20 is exponential as well as being divisible by 2, 4, 5 and 10. 13:20 is going to move our DNA into fifth density. 5 is dynamic throughout the Tzolkin.

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