Essay; The Psychological Need to Infantalize Women in Relationships


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Elaine from “Seinfeld”

The Infantilization of Adult, Professional Women

This article is fairly recent; 2017. My intuition tells me we may be reaching the apex of patriarchal definitions of women’s power as I’m noticing the younger women and men are not exactly absorbing the definition of roles the way we did in the hippie generation. That is to be expected and welcome. I’d rather get on to other issues in our culture but this one does not seem to be dying just yet. In addition, fertility and reproduction rates are going down which is a necessary slow down for the genders to equalize power. Nature is taking its course.

I’m experiencing this attempted “needy chick” projection onto me right now in a

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Lady Gaga

friendship that is almost two years old and has been a roller coaster of unstable behaviors from my friend. I’m done with this part of it now and it feels right to have stricter boundaries in place. I understand that men’s role in the world is being taken to task right now but that’s a good thing. The testosterone-induced inclination to blow stuff up and support the military is a true oppression for the planet and all the life forms that want to reproduce in peace.

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A Great Book About Hillary Clinton, not Written by Her

 

While we hopefully are moving toward the end of the line here with projecting infantile behavior onto women (and men) due to dysfunctional, co-dependent programming from the home, we are still seeing;

“Ambitious women are treated with particular suspicion as if there’s something dubious and undesirable about women who pursue greatness, power, prominence, or even just success in their field. Men who compete with other men are unremarkable; male competition is the natural course of things, and given that men have long dominated electoral politics and many workplaces, competitions for power in politics or the workplace have long been male-only fights. That’s no longer the case. Now, women who pursue power, whether that’s elected office or a managerial role at work, are often competing with men, too. This co-ed competition touches on some of our deepest assumptions and biases about what women are supposed to be. It touches on some of the men’s deepest fears about what they stand to lose.”

“And so women who challenge the status quo must be put in their place. Sometimes, those women come across as so powerful and commanding that it’s tough to cast them as hapless children, and so detractors attack them for being too ambitious, suggesting that they must have gotten where they are through the stereotypical evil-female traits of deception and manipulation. These women are ball-busting bitches, cunning liars, and power-hungry harpies (see, for example, Hillary Clinton, Susan Rice, and Michelle Obama). Other times, women’s power itself is undercut, and this is where treating you like a child comes in. Often, detractors use both tactics against the same women – infantilizing them as princesses or crybabies, and also smearing them as craven or crazy (just ask Elizabeth Warren and Nancy Pelosi).”

“Women who have crossed some ever-changing threshold of what’s young enough to be considered attractive are supposed to drag their sagging carcasses off into the bushes and with dignity (or at least disappear from public view). Few things make misogynists angrier, and a lot of the public more uncomfortable, than the ones who keep talking in public anyway.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Essay; “The Hillary Doctrine”


It is a grievous fact that Hillary has dropped into the shadows somewhat since the election was un-democratically stolen from her, but I still want to talk about her.  She won.  Never let that die.  Never.  She won the election of 2016.

However, just as she was announcing her candidacy, my mate Michael (deceased now asthe-hillary-doctrine-cover of March 2016) bought me a great book, “The Hillary Doctrine”, Sex & American Foreign Policy by Valerie M. Hudson & Patricia Leidl.  I read it in three days.  It is very, very, well written and a brilliant book.

The subjugation of women and all living things on the earth is due in great measure to the U.S. military-industrial complex in alliance with for-profit multinational corporations; tax-payer funded.  This book paints a picture of how that plays out. Unfortunately, Hillary supported some of these corporations in her desire for power.  She was called on the carpet for that frequently, as though her payment for the ascent to power should be any different than a man’s when our government functions as a for-profit business to start wars.  If she was going to be President, there was a price to pay.  I personally wouldn’t have done it and she lost.  These are big failures for her.  She still set a precedent for women all over the world and realized great things in her government positions.  I am grateful to her for these lessons.

The book is a study or a documentary of sorts and is filled with true case scenarios of what has been done to women in Guatemala, Saudi Arabia, and Afghanistan.  It’s gruesome.  It’s non-fiction (true), is documented extensively, and puts our contractors, military, and the U.N. in the hot seat for what they’ve done to women in these countries.  It’s very disturbing and I encourage every feminist to read it.

This book is not about Hillary Clinton, pro-Hillary Clinton, or for Hillary Clinton.  That said, the book IS about her fabulous quote,

“The subjugation of women is a threat to the common security of our world and to the national security of our country.”

Do you think we may have seen this in action on an international scale during the women’s march?  Do you think this may be because Hillary Clinton was known, loved, and respected all over the world, women knew what she stood for and knew who she was, and were protesting the theft of the election from her?  I do.

I ask the Women’s Movement to bring itself up to another notch and conduct itself in a manner that can be taken seriously by the world community rather than a U.S. Pop culture phenom that comes in waves.  Her quote is a big deal.  Read it a few times and then read the book.  The condition of life for women on this planet is as big a deal as the condition of the planet itself!  How many movements fight for the Earth?  About fifty, and probably five big ones.

When I finished reading this book, I had an epiphany about how our minds could shift on this issue of subjugation of women in the war machine.

We all start out as a female in the dark of the womb.

There is no way to Peace, peace is the way (The Quakers)

Woman is peace

There is no way to woman, a woman is a way for life to be manifest

War is the absence of peace, and dark is the absence of light

Man is absent in the absence of woman because he comes through her.

Men start the war, in the dark, in the absence of peace, light, and women.  Therefore, in order for men to make war, they must destroy women.

When men accept that peace is the way, violence toward women will end.  Women must teach men the way of peace.  To do that, we must boldly em-body it and boldly teach it our whole lives, in our bodies, in our homes, in our work, with our children.

The people who believed this and lived it were actually some of our ancestors and some were Quakers.  Look up the history.  Our country was founded to be a beacon, a light on a hill that could not be put out.  The world watches us.  Let’s lead as women…all of us.